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Exposure to Ultrasound in Utero: Epidemiology and Relevance of Neuronal Migration Studies

  • Karel Maršál
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Karel Maršál, MD, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Lund, 22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
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      Abstract

      Despite that epidemiological studies did not indicate negative effects on neurological development of offspring when exposed to diagnostic ultrasound, possible association with nonright-handedness in males could not be excluded. In addition, an experimental study on fetal mice suggested that prolonged ultrasound exposure may cause mild disturbance in neuronal migration. No doubt, further studies are warranted. The present knowledge of the potential bioeffects of ultrasound suggests that, when using ultrasound for examinations in pregnancy, fetal scanning without medical indication should be avoided and that adherence to ALARA principle (use of energy “as low as reasonably achievable”) is compulsory. (E-mail: [email protected] )

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